Tag Archives: east nashville

New Root Vegetables Now at Market

Fresh picked beets from Green Door Gourmet

Fresh picked beets from Green Door Gourmet

This week at the East Nashville Farmers Market, an array of freshly-harvested root vegetables make their debut, along with lots more seasonal spring fruits and veggies grown by our local farmers. The Jones Press food truck will be returning to offer kid-friendly and vegetarian dinner options for our East Nashville families. We are also excited to announce the return of cheese to our market with Lost River Creamery and their raw milk goudas. Our musical guest will be the lovely Lillie Syracuse singing her set of country, blues, and rock ‘n’ roll. So grab a blanket and your favorite people, because this week will be a great week for local food, spring produce, and neighborhood fun. You can view pictures from last week to see what produce we now have in market.

First thing’s first — let’s talk produce! Last week, we saw the premier of some new and interesting seasonal veggetables at our market, and among them our favorite — spring root vegetables! Green Door Gourmet brought a multi-colored display of bright orange carrots, red baby beets, spring onions, and snow white Hakurei turnips — all fresh, crisp and sugar sweet. Kohlrabi was also a fairly-unusual new addition, and we saw the first of the spring sugar-snap and snow peas. Visit the Green Door Gourmet booth this week for all the delicious seasonal vegetables, and keep an eye out for the possibility of fennel to arrive, too! — a light anise-flavored vegetable that can be eaten raw or cooked.

Fresh harvested greens from Delvin Farms

Fresh harvested greens from Delvin Farms

Old School Farm will have another load of beautiful farm greens from the field this week, including mustard, tatsoi, turnip, and chard. Flying S Farms and Delvin Farms will have more bushels of freshly-picked spinach and kales for your salads, stir-fries, smoothies, pies, and more. Local strawberries are still available and arriving fresh from the farms , so get down to the farmers market this week and grab a quart (or bucket) while you still can.

Secondly, we’re thrilled to announce the addition of Kentucky artisan cheese-makers Scott and Angie Harris of Lost River Creamery to our list of East Nashville Farmers Market vendors for the 2015 season. These lost river creamery fresh, small-batch goudas are made by hand in Russellville, Kentucky, with hormone and antibiotic-free raw milk from Grave Family Dairy, and aged in underground caves for a minimum of 90 days. The 9 month aged Logan is so nutty and flavorful, the Harris family has a difficult time keeping up with demand. So stop by their booth and sample one of these excellent artisan cheeses. You’ll want one to take home for your weekend omelet or cheese plate.

laurel mountain farmsOur newest local meat vendor, Laurel Mountain Farms, had mouths watering last week from the smell of their seasoned pork steaks that were sizzling on the grill and sampled out to our market shoppers. These locally-raised steaks are pre-seasoned and can be thrown in a skillet or on a grill for a super-quick and easy meal. So visit their booth this week and sample a smoky bite. We bet you will be taking home Laurel Mountain steaks or chops in your shopping bag.

Finally, we are happy as always to have the fiery, rhinestone-clad Lillie Syracuse performing a set of country, blues, and rock ‘n’ roll for our farmers market guests this week. And in case you forgot, the East Nashville Farmers Market has your Wednesday night dinner covered with The Jones Press food truck and their ever-popular paninis. These yummy pressed sandwiches do sell fast, so arrive early and claim your spot on the lawn. It will be a great spring day, folks, so grab your shopping bags and (as always) your blanket and we’ll see you at Shelby Park!
lillie syracuse

Mary Bragg Plays Grand Opening Festival

We are so excited to announce our very own Nashville singer/songwriter and 2015 Telluride Troubadour Mary Bragg as our special musical guest for our Grand Opening Festival on May 13, 2015. Mary is an award-winning artist whose vocals and musical styling draw comparisons to Folk and Americana greats such as Norah Jones and Patty Griffin. Her latest album, “Edge of This Town” serves-up haunting yet powerful melodies and lyrics sung through a heart-wrenching soulful voice. Not only is Mary an award-winning recording artist, but she is also one of our dedicated volunteers at our East Nashville Farmers Market.Mary.Bragg

Originally from south Georgia, Mary moved to East Nashville in December of 2013 after ten years in New York City where she became widely-acclaimed in the Brooklyn Americana scene. After her relocation South, she immediately began shopping at the East Nashville Farmers Market and joined the Delvin CSA program. Every week, Mary arrived to retrieve her box of local fruits and vegetables, and eventually began working as an ENFM volunteer.

“I love the market for its entrepreneurial spirit–and of course for the local produce!” she says. “Each of the vendors’ passion for what they do keeps me coming back every week.” She goes on to describe why she likes participating in our community market through volunteer work. “It’s my small way of giving back to something that brings me a lot of joy.”

Last year, Mary won the inaugural BandPage/Zoo Labs Music Residency Contest, which enabled her to create her latest album, “Edge of This Town” at Zoo Labs Studios in Oakland, California. She has been busy with tours and co-writes ever since, and recently was accepted into the world-renowned circle of songwriters at The Bluebird Cafe. But when she isn’t touring, recording, or making huge strides in the Nashville music community, she is at the East Nashville Farmers Market helping customers connect with local farmers and food.

Mary is often found at the information booth answering questions and helping market shoppers, and also at the live music tent where she uses her expertise to set-up equipment. But this Wednesday, Mary Bragg will not be serving her community as a volunteer, but gracing our neighbors and market shoppers with her classically trained voice and deeply moving melodies. Every week, this gracious songbird brings so much joy to the East Nashville market, and we are happy we can share her immense talent and giving spirit with you, our market shoppers.

 

Market Season Wrap-Up

beetsNow that the market year has completed, we’d like to reconnect with our customer base and share a brief recap of the season. If you didn’t already hear the great news, the ENFM was voted 3rd best farmers’ market in the Nashville Scene’s “Best Of” edition, losing only to the Franklin and Downtown markets (both being equipped with much larger budgets). This is because many members of our community in East Nashville recognize not only the health benefits of buying  fresh, nutritious produce, but the benefits that are given to the community, as well. Shopping at farmers’ markets encourages the American tradition of the family farm and helps to ensures farmers survive in our community instead of being forced to sell land to developers. Farms support wildlife in their ponds and fence rows and native insect populations. Buying from the local farmer helps to boost our local economy here in Nashville, and it also encourages genetic diversity in the multitude of fruit and vegetables that can be grown and sold when shipping is unnecessary.

slocalAs a smaller market, we are very proud of this recent accolade and will continue to work to create a fun, energetic, and healthy experience for our customers. Our new location in the scenic Shelby Bottoms park has proven to be a success and has lent itself towards the ENFM becoming a destination spot for many members of the community. Events such as our “Fall Festival” and “Ghost Peppers and Goblins” drew crowds in huge numbers and was a ton of fun for kids and parents, alike. We will continue to provide live music, storytelling, and outdoor yoga, as well, which are some of the many attractions that make the ENFM is such a success. We are happy that many of our popular vendors will be returning next season and are excited to welcome some new and interesting  additions, as well.

CSAOur  2015 season gets dusted-off and cranked back up in May, and we are thrilled to see how much we will have grown. Until then, please continue to support local farmers and ready yourselves for another bangin’ market season in East Nashville. And be sure to check out the photos from our final market of the season. See y’all then!
Rebecah Boynton

Ghost Peppers and Goblins

Please join us for the FINAL MARKET DAY of the 2014 season. Be sure to bring by your little monsters for our Ghost Peppers and Goblins Celebration. We will have a costume contest for the children at 4:30 pm. Followed by storytelling at 5:30 pm with Magda the Storyspider. You may even trick-or-treat with our vendors until 6 pm. Purchasing fresh local produce is a wonderful way to support our farmers and an opportunity to let folks know what you would like them to plant next year. Ghost pepper salsa will also be available to taste and purchase from Ousley Ouch Salsa.

Beef Stew Recipe from Triple L Ranch

Beer and Beef Stew

1 lb stew meat
2 T olive oil
2 med sweet onions sliced
3 cloves minced garlic
1 1/2 t dark brown sugar
salt and freshly ground pepper
3 sprigs thyme tied together
1 bay leaf
1 cup beef broth
1 cup beer
1 T whole grain mustard

Directions:
Pre-heat oven to 325 degrees
Pat dry the meat,season with salt and pepper
Coat large dutch oven with olive oil
Over high heat-brown beef in batches–set aside
Turn heat to medium
Add onions stirring for approximately 10 minutes stirring often.  Scrape browned bits.  Add garlic, brown sugar and saute 2 minutes till garlic is fragrant
Turn to high heat add beef  with juices to pot, add thyme and bay leaf.  Pour broth and beer over top and bring to simmer.  Stir in mustard.  
Cover and put in oven for 2-21/2 hours till tender.
Remove thyme and bay leaf.  Adjust seasonings
Serve over cooked noodles or mashed potatoes

See them on Wednesday at the East Nashville Farmers Market at pick up your stew meat.

Collard Greens with Poblano Chiles & Chorizo

From the Lee Bros. Simple Fresh Southern Cookbook Collard Greens with Poblano Chiles & Chorizo
Serves: 4
Time: 5 minutes prep, 15 minutes cooking

Ingredients
2 tsp peanut or canola oil
8 ounces fresh chorizo, casings removed, cut into roughly 1-inch pieces; or 4 ounces cured chorizo, kielbasa or other smoked sausage, finely diced
3 poblano chiles, seeded and sliced into thin 2-to-3 inch strips (about 3 cups)
2 tsp finely chopped garlic
1 1/2 pounds collard greens (about 1 bunch), ribs removed, leaves thinly sliced (1 packed quart)
1 tsp kosher salt, plus more to taste
2 Tbsp red wine vinegar

1. Pour the oil into a 12-inch skillet set over high heat, and when it shimmers, add the chorizo. Cook, chopping up the (fresh) sausage with the back of a spoon, until the sausage has rendered most of its fat, about 2 minutes. Add the poblanos, and continue to cook until they have softened slightly and the chorizo is cooked through, about 4 minutes.

2. Add the garlic, half the collards, the salt, and 2 Tbsp water to the skillet. Cook, turning the collards with tongs and adding more greens as those in the pan wilt, until all the collards are in the skillet. Continue to cook until the collards have softened and become dark green, about 6 minutes. Add the vinegar and continue to cook the collards, turning them occasionally, until the vinegar has completely evaporated and the pan is dry, about 3 minutes more. Season to taste with salt, if necessary, and divide the collards, poblanos and chorizo among 4 warm serving plates. Serve immediately. Enjoy!

Time To Get Adventurous!

A nutritional anthropology study conducted by the University of Florida in 1988 suggested that North Americans had better access to a bigger variety of healthy, fresh foods than most of the rest of the world and yet the average consumer limited themselves to approximately eight to twelve different plant-based foods.  In the quarter century (give or take a few months) that have gone by since then, Americans have begun to put more thought into where their food comes from and how it is produced.

The effort to localize production and consumption has led to rethinking heritage and indigenous food crops that had fallen out of favor.  Our culinary vocabulary is starting to expand and with it comes a more extensive repertoire of dishes and techniques that sometimes start out as experiments and eventually become familiar household favorites.

There are plenty of reasons people don’t eat specific varieties or whole categories of fruits and vegetables.  Sometimes it can be a question of rediscovering a favorite that a grandparent might have grown in the summer. Sometimes it means trying a food you’ve heard of but never tasted.  Sometimes its simply a matter of access. Whatever the reason, local growers are eliminating those excuses.  Which reminds me of one last excuse: you tried it and you didn’t like it.

If your parents were like mine, they probably asked you to try at least a bite or two before deciding it was off the menu for you.  Okay.  I’m going to make that same suggestion.  If you see something in your CSA share or it’s sitting there in your sample box, and you know this food makes you sad to even think that someone somewhere considers it edible, just stop.  Don’t ask to swap it out.  Don’t try to palm it off on the nearest child who looks like he’s dying to carry something fresh to Mommy. In short, quit being a baby.

Here is a list of six foods to look for that you may or may not have tried.


Kale – curly or luxuriantly leafy, this green is packed with nutrients and flavor.  Try it sauteed, in soups, chopped and raw in salads.  One of the classic dishes for this veggie is a stew made with cannellini beans, kale, and chicken.

 

collard greens

Collards – They are a food of the gods.  You can usually find them bundled together in bunches of four to six large leaves. If you want to try something beyond the usual greens-n-pork preparation, take a look at this recipe from an earlier ENFM post: Collard Greens w/ Poblano Chiles and Chorizo.

 

 

 

arugula

 

Arugula – Steve Martin’s character in “My Blue Heaven” couldn’t live without it.  This peppery green makes a great addition to any salad or stir fry.  Great on a fresh tomato sandwich or served as a finger food a la cress.                                                                                                                       

 

Basil

Basil –  This sweet-smelling herb is the primary taste profile in pesto and margherita pizza.  It also makes a great aromatic garnish for cold ades and a soothing addition to an herbal bath.   Try a few leaves  on a toasted sandwich with fresh tomato and provolone.

beets
Beets
 – Most people have tasted them pickled or as crispy veggie chips. The roots are great roasted. The greens?  They perk up a tossed salad and fit right in with any kind of greens mix, cooked or raw.  For a change of pace, go for the tried and true.

 

 

sweet potatoesSweet Potatoes –  Many of us were scared away from this nutritious root vegetable by the glutenous casserole that seemed to appear at every big family dinner.  Topped with burned marshmallows, each mouthful was a minefield of mush and the odd stealth pecan half that might or might not have been properly shelled.  Ah, the holidays!  The good news is that sweet potatoes don’t have to be such gut bombs.  They’re delicious baked with a little butter or olive oil and a pinch of red pepper.

That should get you started.  Okay, Indiana Jones, get out there and try something new to you.  There won’t be a test, but there will be another list with some more familiar-but-not-to-you vegetables.  Until then, bon appetit!

Honestly, it's just a vegetable!

Honestly, it’s just a vegetable!

 

By Jas Faulkner

Santo Niño de Atocha Tortilleria: A Local Tortilla Bakery in Gallatin

alice 3If you’ve visited one of the many farmers markets scattered throughout the city this summer, you may have noticed a slight figure in an oversized jacket, asking if you’d like to try some salsa. Her voice barely carries over the giant cellophane bags of corn chips with a South-of-the-Border accent as authentic as it gets.  Her name is Alice, or the tortilla lady here at the East Nashville Farmers Market and interacting with her feels more like a visit with your grandmother rather than a casual stop at a farmers market booth. I had purchased and quickly devoured a stack of her tortillas months prior, so I was eager to learn more about her background and the story behind her business.  As I approach her booth, she is warm and friendly, as always, and invites me to take a seat beside her. After the initial exchange of polite introductions, I jump right into my first question: “Miss Alice, did you grow up making tortillas with your mother?” Like a silly gringa, I was expecting a story filled with tradition and childhood memories to unfold. Instead, Miss Alice digs a pointy index finger into my knee, leans right in, and spouts, “Hell, NO!”

Spoken like a true Southerner.  We were only on the first question of our interview, yet I was already masa dough in her hands. I was hooked on Alice’s sparkling personality as much as I was her tortillas. And though the story behind Alice’s beginnings  may not be what the typical gringo would expect, it is a story rich with love, family, and togetherness, coupled with an honest desire to provide Nashville with supremely delicious traditional fare.

Alice Heffernan Salazar is actually not from a place south of the border, but from San Antonio, TX, where her family has lived for many generations. (Heffernan is her husband’s name of Irish/German decent, and Salazar is for her father, she lovingly says with her hand over her heart.) Like many Southwestern native Americans and Northern Mexicans, Alice was raised eating flour tortillas instead of the traditional corn, since flour became a foundation to the regional cuisine due to a climate favorable to wheat production and the product’s solid shelf life and shipping abilities. She was 9 years old when she left the Southwest and moved to Chicago, IL, where she and her husband, John, worked in the printing business. And although her trade was not in tortillas, she never forgot her father’s dream of starting a tortilleria of his own. That dream would be forgotten until after their retirement, when  Alice and John came to Nashville to be closer to her daughter, Carole, and son-in-law, Colby. tortilla chips

It was Colby’s idea to initiate the bakery, she admits. He wanted his energetic mother-in-law to have something to keep her busy, so he bought the equipment himself and together they launched the company 4 years ago. The entire family pitched in to help, and together they work side-by-side in the tortilleria. Jokingly, I ask, “So, you learned to make tortillas from your son-in-law, Miss Alice?”  “Yep, ” She replies.  “And guess what? He’s Jewish!” Her sense of humor is devilish and she has everyone around her in stitches. She is adored by all. Plain and simple.

The Santos de Atocha Tortilleria is located at 720 Nashville Pike in Gallatin, TN, in a modest store front in the Sumner Shopping Center. She arrives every morning by 8am and runs the machines until around 10:15am. Piping hot tortillas are ready to be devoured by customers at 10:30am every morning, she says. “Those babies are hot and ready. Just a little salt and salsa, and you’re ready to go.” And thought her story may be a tad nontraditional, her tortillas are anything but. They are made with 3 basic ingredients: corn, water, and lime, and are sold in a variety of sizes, stacked high in warm bundles. The way corn tortillas should be. The corn is local and ground in her store and can be purchased by customers who want to make their own tortillas at home. She also sells a prepared masa for tamale-making, dried corn husks, her addictive crunchy fried corn chips, and fresh  cans of homemade salsa made by her husband, the gringo, she says. Her products can also be found in many stores, such as the Turnip Truck and the Produce Place. More information, including products, prices and where to buy, can be found on her website at www. santostortillas.com.

If you are unable to visit her bakery in Gallatin, Miss Alice is always at the East Nashville Farmers Market (as well as other markets in the area), ready to place a warm bundle of tortillas in your hand that you won’t be able to refuse. You’ll be hooked. Plain and simple.

Submitted by Rebecah Boynton

Waste Not, Want Not

recycling logo

Waste not, want not.  Few would argue with the wisdom of such a principle, but even fewer fully understand the extent to which it can be carried out in household, much less kitchen management. The idea of low to no household commodities waste is sometimes dismissed as a quaint, antiquated holdover from grandparents and great-grandparents who survived the economic depression that hit the US between World Wars.  To many, it has been rebranded. Gramma’s frugality now bears the shiny new title, “sustainable living.”

Is this a bad thing?  Absolutely not. In fact, to cadge a phrase from Martha Stewart, it is a very good thing.

Like organic food production, upcycling/recycling/using every bit of everything from snout to tail is a shiny new concept surrounding older ways that have been kept alive by choice and circumstance.  Those who live in less developed parts of the United States, citizens of aboriginal North American reservations, urban dwellers who understand the need for commodities to be used up of because of the lack of space and resources for disposal, and yes, many college students.

Think you’re already using everything in every way possible?  Here’s a quick way to tell if that is the case:  What does your curb look like on the days the garbage truck rolls through?  If you’re doing everything you should be doing, your average household waste for that week should fit into one, maybe two t-shirt bags.

No? Are you still screaming (on the inside, where it counts) “Hefty! Hefty! Hefty!” as you trudge to the sidewalk?   It’s okay.  We all do it sometimes. If you’re doing it every week, you need to know that it is possible to wean your wastebaskets and trash cans from a steady diet of stuff that could be recycled into rugs, clothing, planters and even fashionable vegan shoes. Keep in mind this kind of change does not have to be a zero sum proposition.  You can start small.  Just start!

Let me help you out with this.  Do you eat Annie’s Mac ‘n Cheese?  The next time you’re in the mood for comfort food and you tear open a package, ad you’re waiting for the water to boil, take a look at the box. Yes, the bunny is cute and the bumper sticker offer that has been open since I was an undergraduate is still on the side. What you’ll also find are tips on how to reuse that box before it finally ends up in your recycling bin.

Low to no waste isn’t limited to paper and plastic.  Take a look at that pretty yellow oval in your CSA box.  For those of you who have never tried spaghetti squash, you’re missing out.  It has the texture and taste of a good veggie pasta prepared al dente the way the school cafeteria ladies never intended. Don’t let this tasty, healthy treat go to waste.

I consulted with my friends and fellow veggie fans, Sylvia and Bill Red Eagle, on the best ways to use every bit of a spaghetti squash.  Starting from the inside out:

Seeds: The tangle of seeds and mushy, fibrous stuff needs to be removed before the rest of it can be cooked.   Once you’ve scooped it out, begin to knead it and you’ll find the seeds will start to fall out.  Rinse them off, buff them barely dry with a clean dishtowel and then spread them out on a cookie sheet.

They’re great plain or you can season them with any of the following: cayenne, chili powder, garlic salt, grated parm or asiago, or cinnamon and a little sugar or (a tiny, tiny amount of) stevia if prefer a sweet snack.  Once you’ve seasoned them or not, pop the tray in an oven set at 275 degrees for five to ten minutes or until the seeds are dry, crisp, and slide around.

This recipe works with any squash or pumpkin seed and those seeds, called pepitas by my father’s people (who also refer to corn as maiz, go figure…) are a great source of protein and fiber.  One cautionary note:  they are very rich in Omega-6, which do weird things to Omega-3s, which you and I and everyone we know  needs.  So, as Cookie Monster might say, they’re probably best eaten as a sometimes snack when you happen to be cooking a winter squash.

Flesh:  Some people boil it, some steam it, the Red Eagles like to cut it in half and bake it flesh side down until the fibers pull away into “noodles”.  They like it as a side with butter, salt and a little sauteed garlic or garlic scapes when they’re in season or as a “chili mac” when the weather in Ft. Worth gets a little colder.  I like it topped with a good “tom ‘n three plus” marinara ( tomatoes, onions, garlic, peppers plus herbs and wine).

The Skin, Stem and Seed Muck:  All of it composts beautifully.  If you have established a place for birds and other neighbor critters to visit and grab a bite, you’ll find that they see the seed muck is like, the best snack ever to squirrels, titmice and black capped chickadees.

So, let’s review.  You started with this ornery hard thing that you wondered if you could use as part of a centerpiece or a decoration for the guest book table at church and now you have a tasty snack, a great meal that is light on the carbs, and some good karma from feeding your fellow earthlings.  Best of all, none of that ended up in the trash.

Hungry for more?  Talk to your local farmer about their favorite ways to use winter squash.  You might want to check out these recipes by two of my favorite chefs/foodways preservation advocates:

Emeril Lagasse’s herbed spaghetti squash is an easy dish after a rushed day.
Rick Bayless’ “Worlds Greatest Chili” includes winter squash as part of his refit of a home kitchen classic.
Bon appetit and keep green!

by Jas Faulkner 

 

Meet the Farmers of Flying S Farm

flying s farmsFlying S Farms is owned and operated by Ben and Catherine Simmons.  The name, Flying S Farms, came from a family history of flying and reaching for the highest standards so that they may provide you with the best produce possible.  The farm was started in 2003 through a strong desire to produce clean, healthy food through good stewardship and farming practices.

They have a 6 acre natural sustainable farm located in Woodbury, Tennessee.  They offer a wide variety of heirloom and non-GMO hybrid produce. The Simmons Family is dedicated to growing tasty, gourmet vegetables and herbs for families that understand that eating wholesome, nutrient-dense food is the foundation for good health and well-being.

Flying S Farms is also committed to creating a healthy environment. They use cover crops to build soil productivity and practice integrated pest management control. They also use foliar fertilizers that are made with food grade products to promote the growth of their crops. The Simmons Family believes that healthy soil produces healthy plants, which therefore produces healthy people.

Catherine, also known as “The Baking Farmer,” offers many wonderful breads and baked goods. Their kitchen is a licensed facility and operates year round.  They are delighted to offer delicious soups, breads and more for any of your special events.  Her baked goods are certainly not to be missed!!!

Come to East Nashville Farmers Market each Wednesday to shake hands with Ben and Catherine Simmons. Meet your farmer and eat local!